Valves - where do we use them?

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Valves are found in virtually every industrial process, including water and sewage processing, mining, power generation, processing of oil, gas and petroleum, food manufacturing, chemical and plastic manufacturing and many other fields. People in developed nations use valves in their daily lives, including plumbing valves, such as taps for tap water, gas control valves on cookers, small valves fitted to washing machines and dishwashers, safety devices fitted to hot water systems, and poppet valves in car engines. In nature there are valves, for example one-way valves in veins controlling the blood circulation, and heart valves controlling the flow of blood in the chambers of the heart and maintaining the correct pumping action. Valves may be operated manually, either by a handle, lever, pedal or wheel.
Valves may also be automatic, driven by changes in pressure, temperature, or flow.
These changes may act upon a diaphragm or a piston which in turn activates the valve, examples of this type of valve found commonly are safety valves fitted to hot water systems or boilers. More complex control systems using valves requiring automatic control based on an external input (i.e., regulating flow through a pipe to a changing set point) require an actuator.Źródło: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Valve

Snakes for plumbing

Drum augers A drum auger is a motorized auger with modular blades designed for various gauges of pipe.
A drum auger is powerful enough to cut through tree roots.

Used unskillfully, they can also damage plastic pipework and even copper tubing. Roto-Rooter Main article: Roto-Rooter The Roto-Rooter is an electric auger invented in 1933 by Samuel Blanc, an American.

His wife called the invention a Roto-Rooter, because the cable and blades rotated as they cut through tree roots inside sewer pipe.

Competing companies made imitations after the Blanc's patent expired in 1953, but the machine is manufactured by and for a United States company called the Roto-Rooter Plumbing & Drain Service.Źródło: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plumber%27s_snakeŹródło: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plumber%27s_snake

Worth to know

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As recently as the late 19th century sewerage systems in some parts of the rapidly industrializing United Kingdom were so inadequate that water-borne diseases such as cholera and typhoid remained a risk. From as early as 1535 there were efforts to stop polluting the River Thames in London.

Beginning with an Act passed that year that was to prohibit the dumping of excrement into the river.

Leading up to the Industrial Revolution the River Thames was identified as being thick and black due to sewage, and it was even said that the river ?smells like death.?24 As Britain was the first country to industrialize, it was also the first to experience the disastrous consequences of major urbanisation and was the first to construct a modern sewerage system to mitigate the resultant unsanitary conditions.citation needed During the early 19th century, the River Thames was effectively an open sewer, leading to frequent outbreaks of cholera epidemics. Proposals to modernise the sewerage system had been made during 1856, but were neglected due to lack of funds. However, after the Great Stink of 1858, Parliament realised the urgency of the problem and resolved to create a modern sewerage system.Źródło: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_water_supply_and_sanitation
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